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Saturday, May 16, 2020 | History

10 edition of Plotinus on Eudaimonia found in the catalog.

Plotinus on Eudaimonia

A Commentary on Ennead I.4

by Kieran McGroarty

  • 15 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press, USA .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Number of Pages264
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7405276M
ISBN 100199287120
ISBN 109780199287123

Plotinus (Greek: Πλωτῖνος) (ca. /5– CE) was a major philosopher of the ancient world. In his system of theory there are the three principles: the One, the Intellect, and the Soul. [1] His teacher was Ammonius Saccas and he is of the Platonic tradition. [2] Historians of the 19th century invented the term Neoplatonism [citation needed] and applied it to him and his Born: , Lycopolis. • E. Eliasson, The Notion of “That Which Depends on Us” in Plotinus and its Background (Leiden: ). • K. McGroarty, Plotinus on Eudaimonia.A Commentary on Ennead I.4 (Oxford: ). • D. O’Brien, Plotinus on the Origin of Matter (Naples: ). • S. Magrin, “Sensation and Scepticism in Plotinus,” Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 39 (),

  "Plotinus on Eudaimonia: A Commentary on Ennead " published on 01 Jan by : David B. Rehm. Noble, Christopher Isaac, “Plotinus’ Unaffectable Soul Heinaman, Robert, “Eudaimonia as an Activity in Nicomachean Ethics –12 Brunschwig, Jacques, “On a Book-Title by Chrysippus: ‘On the Fact that the Ancients Admitted Dialectic along with Demonstrations.

Part One of Smith's book, chapters , deals extensively with the question of Porphyry's originality vis-à-vis Plotinus in psychology, rather than in metaphysics in general, Ennead 6, whereas it seems clear from Plotinus' treatise on eudaimonia, Ennead , that. Raphael, Plotinus (c. ) Authentic human happiness for Plotinus consists of the true human identifying with that which is the best in the universe. Plotinus was one of the first to introduce the idea that eudaimonia (happiness) is attainable only within consciousness.


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Plotinus on Eudaimonia by Kieran McGroarty Download PDF EPUB FB2

Plotinus on Eudaimonia: A Commentary on Ennead I.4 1st Edition by Kieran McGroarty (Author)Cited by: 5. A philosophical commentary on a section of the Enneads written by the last great Neoplatonist thinker, Plotinus.

The treatise is entitled 'Concerning Well-Being' and was written at a late stage in Plotinus' life when he was suffering from an illness that was shortly to kill by: 5. A philosophical commentary on a section of the Enneads written by the last great Neoplatonist thinker, Plotinus.

The treatise is entitled 'Concerning Well-Being' and was written at a late stage in Plotinus' life when he was suffering from an illness that was shortly to kill him. Plotinus on eudaimonia: a commentary on Ennead I [Kieran McGroarty; Plotinus.] -- "This is the first full-length commentary on Plotinus' Ennead I.4 (46), a work written at a late stage in Plotinus' life when he was suffering from an illness that was shortly to prove fatal.

Summary: A philosophical commentary on a section of the Enneads written by the last great Neoplatonist thinker, Plotinus. The treatise is entitled 'Concerning Well-Being' and was written at a late stage in Plotinus' life when he was suffering from an illness that was shortly to kill him.

Books shelved as eudaimonia: Meditations by Marcus Aurelius, The Soul of Man Under Socialism by Oscar Wilde, 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos by J. Plotinus on Eudaimonia: A Commentary on Ennead I This chapter discusses Plotinus’ attempt, at the beginning of his treatise On Happiness (Ennead I 4 [46]), to define what is a genuinely good life as opposed to approaches by some of his predecessors such as Aristotle, the Stoics, and the Epicureans.

It is argued that before presenting his own view on happiness, Plotinus picks out several technical terms, traditionally used by. Plotinus' recognises the possibility of conflict between self-referential aims and the good of the kosmos.

His solution resembles closely one attributed sometimes to the : Pauliina Remes. Similar books and articles. Plotinus on Eudaimonia: A Commentary on Ennead I. Kieran McGroarty - - Oxford University Press.

The Essential Functions of a Plotinian Soul. Damian Kalouri - - Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science Eudaimonia (Greek: εὐδαιμονία [eu̯dai̯moníaː]), sometimes anglicized as eudaemonia or eudemonia / j uː d ɪ ˈ m oʊ n i ə /, is a Greek word commonly translated as happiness or welfare; however, "human flourishing or prosperity" [better source needed] and "blessedness" have been proposed as more accurate translations.

Etymologically, it consists of the words "eu" ("good. What is Eudaimonia. (Incl. Definition) In its simplest (translated) form, eudaimonia is often taken to mean happiness (Deci & Ryan, ; Huta & Waterman, ; Heintzelman, ).

Sometimes it is translated from the original ancient Greek as welfare, sometimes flourishing, and sometimes as well-being (Kraut, ). The concept of Eudaimonia comes from Aristotle’s Missing: Plotinus. Plotinus offers a comprehensive description of his conception of a person who has achieved eudaimonia.

“The perfect life” involves a man who commands reason and contemplation. (Enneads I) A happy person will not sway between happy and sad, as many of Plotinus’ contemporaries believed. But there are underlying connections between the person Aristotle and Plotinus most favoured in these books.

Not only was the focus of each, in different ways, on the perfection of an individual self, those who could be most eudaimon were recognised as an elite 31 who could not contribute to their community’s life with that activity. The main purpose of this chapter is not to present a comprehensive account of human happiness.

Plotinus, aims, rather, to show other philosophers, especially Aristotelians and Stoics, that their many correct ideas are fully viable if and only if they give up certain unacceptable doctrines and replace them with his own cardinal proposition - that a perfect human being is detached from.

Plotinus (c.A.D. - ) was an Egyptian/Greek/Roman philosopher of the Hellenistic period. He is widely considered the founder (along with his less famous teacher Ammonius Saccas) of the Neo-Platonism movement.

Many later Christians and Muslims were influenced by his Neo-Platonism (or by Platonism acquired through the mediation of Plotinus' teachings). More than. PLOTINUS AND THE ENNEADS.

Plotinus was a Platonist philosopher from Egypt who lived in Rome during the third century CE. His Enneads were edited by his disciple Porphyry and include diverse themes. Porphyry also bequeathed a biography of relevance.

The well known conflict of Plotinus with Gnostic trends admits of various complexities. Kieran McGroarty, Plotinus on Eudaimonia: A Commentary on Ennead I Oxford: Oxford University Press,Pp.

ISBN $   Plotinus on Eudaimonia_ A Commentary on Ennead download. Plotinus on Ennead VI Books 1 to 5 by 3 download. Ennead VI Books 6 to 9 by 3 download.

download 3 files. ZIP. Uplevel BACK M. SCHOPENHAUER. In chapter 1, Yount discusses the nature and possibility of the ultimate philosophical experience of the first principle of being.

This experience or vision is mystical, and according to this interpretation of Plotinus’ doctrine of the One and the account he. Plotinus taught that there is a supreme, totally transcendent "One", containing no division, multiplicity, or distinction; beyond all categories of being and "One" "cannot be any existing thing", nor is it merely the sum of all things (compare the Stoic doctrine of disbelief in non-material existence), but "is prior to all existents".

". Plotinus identified his "One" with the.Plotinus is the greatest philosopher in the year period between Aristotle and Augustine. He thought of himself as a disciple of Plato, but in his efforts to defend Platonism against Aristotelians, Stoics, and others, he actually produced a reinvigorated version of Platonism that later came to be known as "Neoplatonism".

In this volume, sixteen leading scholars introduce .Two views continue to be defended today. One is that the account of eudaimonia in EN 10 is inconsistent with claims made about it in other books of the work. The other view is that the account in EN 10 is consistent with other claims made in the other books because Aristotle presents one account of perfect eudaimonia by portraying it as consisting solely in .